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Science Prizes
The Nicholas Kurti Science Prize for Europe

The Nicholas Kurti Science Prize for Europe

Oxford Instruments NanoScience is proud to sponsor the Nicholas Kurti Science Prize for Europe for research in physical science. The Prize celebrates its 14th anniversary this year.

The objective of this Science Prize is to promote and recognise the novel work of young scientists working in the fields of low temperatures and/or high magnetic fields in Europe. Oxford Instruments is aware that there is a critical and often difficult stage for many between completing their PhD and gaining a permanent research position. The company therefore would like to help individuals who are producing innovative work by offering assistance both financially and through promotion of their research work.

All candidates should be nominated by a senior member of their department or Institute.

The prize is awarded by a committee of senior academics based throughout Europe.

The Nicholas Kurti Science Prize consists of:

  • €8,000 cash prize
  • a certificate and trophy
  • support to attend a conference in Europe

We have announced the 'call for nominations' for the 2019 Science Prize. Click here to find out more.

 


Nicholas Kurti 

The European prize for physics is named after Professor Nicholas Kurti (1908-1998). Professor Kurti is known for his distinguished work in ultra-low temperature physics at the Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford University. In fact, this location earned the name “the coldest spot on earth” as a consequence of the ground-breaking research conducted there. Using nuclear demagnetisation in conjunction with helium dilution refrigerators of nuclear alignment, Professor Kurti was able to create temperatures of a millionth of a degree above absolute zero.

There is a strong connection between Oxford Instruments and Professor Kurti. Sir Martin Wood, the founder and deputy chairman of Oxford Instruments, held the Senior Research Officer position at the Clarendon Laboratory in the 1950s with responsibility for the engineering facility of the high magnetic field section of the laboratory which was directed by Nicholas Kurti. When Professor Kurti retired, he decided to apply his low temperature physics knowledge to the kitchen. He created a new science, Molecular Gastronomy, the application of scientific principles to the understanding and improvement of small scale food preparation. Chefs, scientists and food writers around the world have developed the subject since his death in 1998.

Oxford Instruments NanoScience would like to thank Mrs Giana Kurti for her agreement to name the prize after her late husband.

2019 Nicholas Kurti Science Prize

Links

Committee Members

Prize Comittee Chairman:

Professor George Pickett, Lancaster University

Prize committee members:

Professor Rolf Haug, Universität Hannover 

Professor Maan, University of Nijmegen

Professor Vladimir Dmitriev, P L Kapitza Institute of Physical Problems

Professor Dominik Zumbühl, University of Basel and

Dr Silviano De Francheshi, CEA-INAC

Other Science Prizes

Previous Nicholas Kurti Science Prize Winners

2005 Nicholas Kurti Science Prize Winner

2009 Nicholas Kurti Science Prize Winner

2013 Nicholas Kurti Science Prize Winner

2006 Nicholas Kurti Science Prize Winner

2010 Nicholas Kurti Science Prize Winner

2014 Nicholas Kurti Science Prize Winner

2007 Nicholas Kurti Science Prize Winner

2011 Nicholas Kurti Science Prize Winner

2015 Nicholas Kurti Science Prize Winner

2008 Nicholas Kurti Science Prize Winner

2012 Nicholas Kurti Science Prize Winner

2016 Nicholas Kurti Science Prize Winner